Monday, June 14, 2004

Found a place, set a date. Happy, happy, happy.

The ceremony will take place here.
http://www.shadowbrook.com/gazebo.html
http://www.shadowbrook.com/ceremonies_gazebo.html

The cocktail hour will take place here.
http://www.shadowbrook.com/english_courtyard.html

The reception will take place here.
http://www.shadowbrook.com/victorian_suite.html

Since you can't see the layout of the rooms in the photos, here is a diagram that I drew.
http://f2.pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/brex2k3/detail?.dir=/9286&.dnm=4349.jpg

This is totally NOT knitting related, but whatever. Its much cooler than knitting, trust me.

Wednesday, June 09, 2004

My Brownie Recipe

Since I'm going to be making these tomorrow, I figured I'd share at least the recipe with you folks who happen to read this journal. I commented with this recipe once in the LiveJournal Cooking Community, and I have yet to hear a complaint about the brownies sucking. The recipe is foolproof and they are your worst enemy if you are couting your calories, but they are totally worth it.

Nicole's Best Brownies EVER.
Ingredients:
2 Sticks Butter, at room temperature
4 Eggs
2 Tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil
2 1/2 Tablespoons Vanilla Extract
1 (12 oz) bag Semi-sweet Chocolate Chips (yup! the entire bag!)
1 Cup All Purpose Flour
1 Cup Granulated Sugar
1 Cup Brown Sugar
1/2 Teaspoon Salt
Cinnamon to taste.

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 350. Line your brownie pan with tin foil and coat with Crisco, butter, Pam or another greasing agent.
2. Melt the butter, the chocolate and the olive oil together and stir to combine.
3. In a seperate bowl, beat the eggs with the flavorings (the sugars, salt, vanilla and cinnamon).
4. Stir in the melted chocolate mixture to the sugar and egg mixture.
5. Add the flour and fold and stir until the batter is just combined. It is okay for the flour to still be somewhat visible.
6. Pour into your prepared pan.
7. Bake at 350 for about 45 minutes. It is better to under-bake your brownies than to over-bake them, unless you like crunchier brownies.
8. Let cool, then enjoy them without thinking about how thier nutritional content will mess with your daily dietary intake.

Monday, June 07, 2004

Just curious...

Since I keep getting wind of this common anti-acrylic fiber theme amongst knitters, I feel as though I need to ask these questions for those of you who fall into that camp.

1. Open all your drawers, peek inside your closets. Now, look at the tags. Is every article of clothing in there a 100% natural fiber? I doubt everything you wear that's premade is 100% natural, so why are you such a hardass when it comes to this?

2. In reference to "special pieces", if everything you knit is made from the finest fibers you can buy, then how does one differentiate between the piece that is your typical project for everyday use and the piece that is made for a special occassion?

For instance, Knitter Acrylic makes her everyday projects using acrylic yarn. However, when Knitter Acrylic wants to make a special item for a special occassion or event, Knitter Acrylic uses non-acrylic yarns. Therefore, the project is even more special. On the other hand, Knitter Wool uses only natural fibers for everything. When Knitter Wool wants to make a special project, she still only uses natural fibers, so the making of the piece isn't quite as special because she is used to that caliber of fiber. Get it?

I mean, really now. Is it me or is this whole thing starting to sound a lot like grade school where it was only cool if you wore the brand name clothes? Its freakin' yarn, people. Get over it! Its a hobby, not a competition. Besides, if it WAS a competition, I'm positive that I could knit circles (cables? lace? short rows? I dunno!) around a lot of the people who use natural fibers only, ya know what I mean?

Be proud of WHAT you knit, not what you knit WITH.